WaMu Chase Contact Information

Washington Mutual home loan customers are “serviced” by Chase. In late September 2008, the FDIC sold Washington Mutual’s assets, secured debt obligations and deposits to JPMorgan Chase & Co. Home loans which originated with Washington Mutual and are in default end up with Chase Home Finance in California; it is possible (unverified) that all Washington Mutual originated loans are handled in California by Chase Home Finance. Following is a list of key Washington Mutual Chase contacts with phone numbers and/or web addresses when available:

Chase Home Finance (generic): (800) 848-9380 [This number handles home loans (in default) originated by Washington Mutual]

Chase Home Finance (Direct fax): (904) 462-1926

Chase Loss Mitigation: (866) 316-9218

Chase Loss Mitigation Alternate Numbers: (866) 349-3540; (800) 446-8939

Chase Customer Service (generic): (866) 550-5705

Chase general fax (generic): (866) 282-5682

You cannot do it alone. Get a HUD-approved counselor to negotiate on your behalf. They are FREE. Go to Springboard (800) 431-8456 for Nonprofit Consumer Credit Management or visit: www.credit.org

Click on http://www.credit.org/housing/loan-modification-program and get started. Chase says they want to help but they are giving lip service only to the American people. Your tax dollars have paid for HUD-approved counseling, use it!

Why use a counselor? Because when you fill out the forms, Chase is running your numbers up against a “black box” formula only they know. Your counselor can at least tell you when your numbers are way out of line and exceed national averages. You need to use every tool in your arsenal to fight the Chase machine and get a loan modification.

You will need to submit a third-party authorization form to allow a counselor to speak on your behalf with Chase. Request the form from both Chase and see if your own HUD-approved counselor has a form. Submit both immediately so Chase can’t stall.

HAMP & $729,750…this is the dollar cap on loan balances which can be modified by HAMP, but the number is misleading. A dollar cap is assigned to each county in the nation. For example, in Cape May County, NJ, the HAMP cap is $487,500. Because my loan balance is greater than $487,500, (and also happens to be greater than $729, 750) I do not qualify for a HAMP modification. I qualify only for a CHAMP (Chase in-house program) modification. Save time and aggravation and learn your county HAMP cap to determine if you even qualify for a HAMP modification!

Chase Homeowner’s Information Packet: https://www.chase.com/ccpmweb/chf/document/Borrowers_Assistance_Form_Chase_Fill_2009.pdf  

Chase Home Ownership Centers (allegedly they will help you submit & follow-up on modification paperwork): https://www.chase.com/chf/mortgage/hrm_centers

Still chasing answers from David Lowman CEO Chase Home Lending

May 12, 2010: Having not heard back from anyone at Chase regarding my April 19, 2010 letter to David B. Lowman, CEO Chase Home Lending, even though I had a USPS Certified Mail delivery confirmation dated April 21, 2010 at 10:54 am, I decided to try sending my letter to an alternate e-mail address. I thought I’d deduced the Chase e-mail protocol and had already sent David.B.Lowman@chase.com  a copy of my letter; it was not returned as undeliverable. But I’d heard nothing after almost a month, so I tried an alternate e-mail address and sent the letter to David.B.Lowman@jpmchase.com to see what might happen.  It was not returned as undeliverable, but who even knew what that meant.

Mr. David Lowman probably had someone intercepting his e-mail along with his regular mail and routing it to who knows where. I really needed answers about my loan modification.

The Wall Street Journal seeks answers from Chase

May 10, 2010: I went back and forth by e-mail throughout the day with the Wall Street Journal reporter, answering questions about my financial situation, why I was still waiting, why I hadn’t just sold my house, etc. At the end of the day the reporter told me he’d just asked Chase why I hadn’t gotten an answer after almost 15 months. I was stunned.

Would it take the Wall Street Journal to get an answer from Chase about my loan modification? That was crazy! Why couldn’t regular people get straight answers from Chase?

It seemed to me that Chase was continuing the deceptive practices originated by Washington Mutual. I wasn’t the only one who felt that way; Treasury Secretary Timothy Geithner vowed to crack down on shoddy practices…maybe I should write him a letter as well.

Chase Home Lending Executive Office returns a call

May 10, 2010, 4:46 pm: Shawnte Trowlsdell from the Chase Home Lending Executive Office called. She was returning my call about my letter to Mr. David Lowman earlier in the day and the e-mail she’d received from Marissa. Shawnte told me she’d just started her job a week ago Monday (assuming this was 5/3/10); she got my case on Friday (assuming 5/7/10) and that she was taking on Olga Danilova’s entire caseload of about 100 cases – per Shawnte, it was all a “big mess”. I asked her if she was just filling in for Olga since I knew Olga was out of the country for two weeks; Shawnte said she wasn’t really sure about that but Olga would not be coming back; she was “no longer in the department”. Shawnte said she was trying to sort through everything; she did not have a lot to go on and no one had briefed her. Per Shawnte, it really was a mess as Olga had taken no notes and never called anyone back; customers were very upset.

I said that Olga had actually called me twice and e-mailed me three times; Shawnte interrupted to say with surprise and some relief that I was the first person to say anything like that about Olga, no one else could ever get in touch with her. I said that although Olga had occasionally made contact nothing much ever came of it but the purpose of my call was to follow-up on my letter to Mr. David Lowman.

I told Shawnte I was happy she’d called and while I’d like to talk about my loan modification, right now I wanted to find out why I’d not heard back from Mr. Lowman. Shawnte was very nice and said there was an awful lot in my file to go through and she’d quickly looked for the letter…had I sent it in May? I said no, it was dated 4/19/10 and confirmed received 4/21/10; perhaps she should look more in that date range. Shawnte couldn’t find the letter but she did mention that she saw in my file a letter was to have been sent out to me on April 30, 2010, but for some reason it did not go out; perhaps it was in editing? She could not see the actual letter to me nor could she see what the letter might be about. She trailed off and said “something” happened to the letter; it did not go out. That was interesting. So what was the phone call from Olga all about?

Shawnte went on to ask me more about my letter to Mr. Lowman. I explained about his testimony before Congress… and that I’d written regarding same. She said she would need to read up on my file and get back to me, most likely by the end of the week. I asked Shawnte about her schedule and she told me she was in Ohio; her hours were 9 to 5 but because she was so new, she was in training each day from 1 to 5, which was frustrating as it made it difficult to return homeowner’s calls. Her direct phone number was (614) 422-3764 and she was going to speak with her supervisor to see what could be done about getting a response to my letter to Mr. David Lowman.

Mr. David Lowman offered something to the American people when he testified to the House Committee on Financial Services. He said that people who sought answers from Chase about their loan modifications should come to him…where the heck was he and how could anyone reach him?

Mr. David Lowman Chase Home Lending CEO, I need answers!

May 10, 2010, 3:08 pm: It had been thirteen business days since confirmed USPS Certified Mail delivery (April 21, 2010) of my letter to Mr. David Lowman regarding his testimony before the House Committee on Financial Services. It was time to place a follow-up call to the Chase headquarters in Manhattan. I dialed (212) 270-6000 and asked to speak with Mr. David Lowman. I was told to stay on the line; after about a minute on hold Marissa from the Chase Home Lending Executive Office picked up and asked for my loan number!

I told Marissa I was calling regarding a letter to Mr. Lowman dated 4/19/10, mailed to New York and with receipt confirmation dated 4/21/10; was she in New York? Marissa said she was not, she was in northern Louisiana. She asked repeatedly for my loan # which I declined to provide. Instead I asked what happened to the calls and mail directed to the New York office. Marissa said she was an “operator” and operators could be located in OH, LA & FL. She went on to say that any correspondence sent to Mr. Lowman would be tracked, filed and retrievable by loan number; with that, I reluctantly provided my loan number. Marissa asked permission to put me on hold while she pulled the file and read the notes. I agreed and reiterated I was seeking a response or at least an acknowledgement of my letter to Mr. David Lowman, Chase Home Lending CEO.

After a few minutes Marissa came back on the line to report that she could see my letter was received and logged into the system under my case, but she did not see any other notations of any kind. I asked what would happen? Had Mr. Lowman ever actually received the letter, and had he read it? Marissa replied that she was “not saying that he doesn’t read it”, she was just reporting what she could see in my file. I asked if I should fax the letter to him, or mail it again.

Marissa said she could verify the letter had been received and that my case had been assigned to Shawnte Trowlsdell. Marissa said she would send an e-mail to Shawnte and ask her to respond. Marissa was very polite and genuinely trying to be helpful. She confirmed my telephone number and told me she would see to it that Shawnte got back to me. I thanked her and we ended the call.

Can the Wall Street Journal get Chase loan modification answers?

May 10, 2010: A reporter from the Wall Street Journal responded to a copy of my letter to Mr. David Lowman, CEO Chase Home Lending. He wanted to know if I’d heard back from Mr. Lowman and I told him I had not. It had been thirteen business days since confirmed USPS Certified Mail delivery (April 21, 2010) of my letter to Mr. David Lowman regarding his testimony before the House Committee on Financial Services and I’d planned to place a follow-up call later in the day.

With that we spoke about a story the Wall Street Journal was developing about people who were worse off after having applied for a loan modification. I knew that simply applying for a modification resulted in a ding on your credit record and as we spoke it became clear I was much worse off having waited for almost 15 months with no definitive and actionable response from Chase on a loan modification.

I had drained my savings, damaged my credit rating and spent countless hours chasing answers about how I might work something out with Chase to revise the terms of the mortgage. I knew I did not qualify for a HAMP modification but I also knew Chase had an in-house modification program; everything in life is negotiable if you can meet face to face with a decision-maker. I wondered if the Wall Street Journal might be able to get answers when I could not, and decided I had little to lose by participating in the article.

Chase Home Finance only calls when they want to

May 10, 2010, 2:00 pm: Natalia Carrillo at Chase (800) 848-9380 ext. 382-3158 had not returned my call; it had been over 48 hours if we were counting business days only, although Natalia had called me once on a Sunday (April 25, 2010 at 3:55 pm), so it had really been over 72 hours without a call back, or any contact from Chase. It had also been eleven days since my financial interview with Chase – so what exactly were these new processes? They seemed like the same old Chase processes: ignore, obfuscate and deny.